Boring head

Abstract

Claims

Feb. 1, 1949. c, GILLETTE 2,460,689 BORING HEAD Filed April 11 1945 2 Sheets-Sheet l 1 67 INVENTOR. zyazz/zzra Cf G'LZZefie Feb. 1, 1949. H. c. GILLETTE BORING HEAD 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 11 1945 INVENTOR. fi zaara ''azic zie BY: 1 Patented Feb. 1, 1949 UNITED STATES PAT-EM Q'FFEIC'E $460,689 nowa-re e. Gillette, Gates, N. Y. Applicafioh Ami! 1 1, 1945 "serial No. 5s"1; m9 "This lnventien relates to a bor in head, and V head of light and 'compact form, but witih suihient strengthens rigidity-sothzt it rrrey he il'seil' foi boring of g 'reait eceiirztey. 5A further object is the rovision 'ef a b'uring head so designed and eonstructed it may be used for *borin'g "operations performeii either *on a boring machine, milling machine, or lathe, or-"on'other-machinetools. l These and other de'sirable objects are aocom plishe'ii by the construction disclosed as un illustraiiive embodiment "of "the invention in Yiihe following description and in the accompanying drawings iermirig' a part hereof, in whiehz" Fig. 1 is "a side elevation of a boring nead-iii actiordaince with a. preferred 'embodirnent of the invention Eig. 2 is ahbottom plan view thereof; Fig. is a tep plan viewthereof Fig. 4 is a bottom plan view with the -0OV8I or casing removed, -showing the adjustable zper ts in on'e positionof adjustment; Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4 showing the :pants-ine different position of adjustment; Fig. 6 is a side elevation viewed 'from the direction of the arrow 6"in Fig. 4; 'Fig. '7 is aside elevation similar to'Fig. 1' but with the-casing in section so asto show anfele'va tionel view of thepart's inside the easing; Fig. 8 is a vertical "sedtion t'ziken substantially on'the'line' 8-3 of Fig. 3; Fig. "'9 is a vertical section on 'a larger settle, takenslibstaiitillyhn the line 9 9 Of Fig. "3; Fig. 10 is a horizontal section taken-substantiezlly-bnthe line I'fi-F0 ofFigiQ; Fig '11 is'a view similar to afragmentiifFigfiO showing the "parts in it different position ere-e: justment; Fig; '12 is a view of the boring tool earfiier removed 'fr'o'rn'the "rest dfthe boring head; and Fig. 13 is a perspectivevlew of the adfi ustirig nut whih positions the boring "tool 'ealfrr'ier. Thesalme reference numerals 'threulieiit' the several view's indicetethesairile parts. in performing b'dring operations with eummg tool was distinguis'heil flibm dfiil11n"g mpereztions performed with a twist drill, foriiemmplew the boring toel and the work ere rotated relatively to each otherveboutam axis :of rotsitienpand tlse boring 'toel is of smaller size'ithan the cllmneter of the Hole :80 ee bored, the diameter of ffihe hele being dependent upon "the extent ito'whieh :the cutting edge rof the'rteol is offset eccrentricallw f'rbm ithe'zaxis of rotation. in certeih itypes =eTf m a'ehine tools, sashes-1am ordinary engine :larthe, it is misusing-the workxer stock which i'swotsstefl, while the b'ori'rig tool remeiinssttttien-ary except fer its ieeclihg movement. In ether typesef machme tools, such as a vertical spindle mining m'afciiiiee, it usuall the work or stock whih l'eziiziins stefionary, wl-lile the'beringtom is'l dtaftefi as We'll es parrtaleing at a longitudinal iedi'rig newer or carrier for heidirrg the boi iiig' todl, =rhechenis'm for adjusting the position 6f 'tlie holder or oarrier so as tova ry the' elwer'itricity df the 'eut'fiirig "edge 'of the boring tob'l w ith respectto the exis e f theshank. Other a'r-mngements :of th'e seim'e general' chemeter 312% here'- te'ior'e :h'een ipi'epesecl but it is believed itlsmt the present ermngem'eht here rdis'close'd 'a 'epresehtsa substantialimprovement iover the prior-Ic'un'struc tiens. iidcorditfg to the pres'ent inventienwher'e isipm- 'vide'd a shank- :2! forlrnounting', for exalmfileflon the spihdle ef (a, vertical milling machine. This shank eer-mes e, elate 22's, :conveniently rof circula iwhine-"when viewe in p'l'em as in Big. :3, and @reiereihly termed integrally-With theishank 1|. Mounted on the lower face :61 this ipl-afte iz s -is the lab'ring" tool holder :or earlier I25=i0fi';he irl'glflar shape' shown in Figs. "4, 5, Amfland I112, whlehlifelder iis 'ipivoted ln'earr o'ne endaen ithe piv'ot p in' Z'NfiXecl to the 4318178.? 3 :nearione edgeithereo'f. Neair aits mic'ldle, the carrier l25ris provided with a seeket @321 :in which :the TShaHk Of the boring tool 33 may The mounted, to "be :removably yet firmly held-ashei ein by' the set screw 35. The boring it'ool has' .a cutting edge $13 of any convenient form or shespe. The iend of 117h8 h01d6l"01 carrier *25"Whi6h"li'$ ire'mote lfrom the jipivot :21? is somewhat narrowed lasfsen'zinithe drawings, ian d is received in asnug sliding fit between the lower side of the plate 23, on the one hand, and a stirrup member 4| on the other hand, which stirrup member is secured as ,or bore 49 in the carrier 25, presses leftwardly (when viewed as in Fig. 9) against one end of the stirrup 4|, and presses rightwardly against the carrier 25, constantly tending to swing the carrier in a counterclockwise direction (when viewed from above) about its pivot 21. .The bottom surface of the plate Z3 is provided, approximately in line with'the stirrup 4|, lead screw 53 having fixed thereto a graduated head or disk 55 extending out through a slot 51 4 socket 3| and opening 8| (the cutting tool being removed from the socket, of course) and when he sees the punch prick centered in the small hole 8|, he knows that the socket 3| for the cutting tool is accurately alined with the axis of the shank 2|. To aid in setting the cutting tool properly in the socket, the bottom of the housing 59 carries an index mark Tl. The'cutting tool should be so jset'in the'so'cket 3| (when this socket is alined with'the shank 2|, as indicated by the visibility of the punch mark through the hole 8|) that the bottom edge of the cutting tool points directly with a channel or slot 5| in which is mounted a to an accessible position at the topand front of V wardly projecting lug 63 with a rounded end en-. gaging in a rounded recess 65 in the carrier 25. . When the disk 55 is rotated in one direction, the nut 6| travels along the screw 53 in a leftward direction when viewed as in Fig. 9, and the lug 63 onv this nut, engaging in the recess 65 on the carrier 25, swings the end of the carrier in a leftward direction against the force of the spring 41, thusswinging'the carrier in a clockwise direction (when viewed from above) about its pivot 21. When the disk 55 is rotated in the opposite 7 direction, the nut 6| travels rightwardly on the lead screw 53,.and thus releases the'pressure on the carrier so that the spring AI-may return the carrier in a rightward or counterclockwise direction, the spring always keeping the carrier in tight engagement with the lug 63 on the nut 6|- Preferably the disk 55 is graduated with suitable'graduations, as indicated in the drawings, reading directly in thousandths of an inch or other'suitable units of measurement, which are read in connection with a zero line or index mark 51 (Fig. 6) on the exterior of acup-shaped casing or housing 69 which encloses the moving parts and which is removably secured to the main plate 23 as by screws 1|. This housing 69 has an opening 73 (Fig. 1) in line with the set screw 35, so that the set screw may be readily reached by a wrench, and it also has an arcuate opening 15 (Fig. 2) in its bottom, to allow ample room for passage'of the boring tool 33 in any position to whichgthe carrier 25 may be swung. toward the line or mark 11, as indicated in Fig. 2. flhis line 1'! constitutes a fragment of an imaginary radius drawn from the axis of the shank 2|, perpendicular to a radius drawn from this axis through the pivot 21. When the lower edge of the cuttin tool points toward the mark 11, it follows that this lower edge of the tool is perpendicular to a radius drawn from thetool to the pivot '21, and thus is as itshould be to obtain proper engagement of the cutting edge of the tool with the workto be cut, in any position to which the-carrier 25 may be swung. . In use,;the boring tool 33 is fixed in the socket 3|, and the shank 2| is clamped firmly in the chuck of the rotating spindle of a vertical milling machine or the like, so that the longitudinal axis of. the shank 2| becomes the axis of rotation of theentire boringhead. The diameter of the hole to. be bored by the cutting tool. 33 may then be adjusted by suitable manipulation of the graduatedwheel 55. When the wheel 55 is turned to swing theflcarrier 25 farther in a clockwise direction, when viewed from above, this offsets the cutting tool 33 farther from the longitudinal When'the carrier 25 is substantially at one extreme limit of its travel (that is, the extreme counterclockwise limit, when viewed from above) the socket 3| for holding the boring tool 33 is alined with the axis of the shank 2| To enable the machinist tosee when exact alinement exists, for purposes of calibration, the bottom of the socket 3| is provided with a small opening 8| (Fig.8) extendin entirely through the thickness of the carrier 25, and the lower face of the plate 23"is provided with a punch prick or other suitable mark 'directly in line with the axis of the shank 2 l. The machinist may sight through the axis of the shank 2|, thus increasing the eccentricity of the cutting tool with respect to the 1 rotary axis of the work, resultingin the boring of a larger diameter hole. By turning the adjusting wheel-55 in the opposite direction, the cutting tool will be brought closer to the rotary axis and thus a hole of smaller diameter will be bored. Normally the direction of rotation of the boring head is a clockwise rotation when viewed from above, and the clockwise rotation of the plate 23 drives the carrier 25 in a positive manner, throughthe nut 6|. The driving force does not pass through the spring 41, which merely keeps the carrier constantly engaged with the nut. Moreover, the reaction force of the work against the cutting tool is very largely in a direction to be.resist ed by the pivot 21, with usually only a minor component' of force toward the nut, so that thisnut does not have to bear the full brunt of the cutting force, but only a fraction thereof. It will be observed that the construction above disclosed is made of few parts, easily machined and constructed, so that the appliance may be made relatively inexpensively. Yet it is of sturdy and rigid design, standing up well under long continued and rough usage, and enabling the accomplishment of boring operations of great accuracy. It is seen from the foregoing disclosure that a construction is provided which admirably fulfills the above-mentionedobjects of the invention, It is tobe understood that the foregoing disclosure is given byway of illustrative example only, rather than by way of limitation,;and that without departing from the invention, the construction may' bevaried within thescope of the appendedclaims. What is claimed is: 1. A boring head for use with a machine tool, including a member for attachment to the machine tool, a carrier pivotally mounted on said member for oscillation with respect thereto, said carrier extending in a generally radial direction from its pivotal connection with said member, a socket on said carrier intermediate its ends for holding a boring tool, a stirrup secured to said member for embracing the end of said carrier remote from said pivotal connection to confine said carrier against movement in a direction away from said member while allowing it to swing in a direction parallel to said member, adjusting screw means thrusting against said carrier in one direction at a point remote from said pivotal connection, and a spring thrusting against said carrier in the opposite direction. 2. A boring head for use with a machine tool, including a shank for attachment to the machine tool, a plate attached to said shank, said plate being of disk-like form and having an approximately circular outline substantially concentric with said shank, a pivot mounted on said plate adjacent one edge thereof, a carrier mounted on said pivot to oscillate thereon and extending in an approximately diametrical direction from said pivot across said plate, a socket at an intermediate point of said carrier for receiving a boring tool, and means mounted on said plate and cooperating with said carrier near the end thereof remote from said pivot, for adjusting the position of said carrier relatively to said plate to adjust the eccentricity of a boring tool mounted on said carrier with respect to the axis of said shank. 3. A construction as described in claim 2, further including a stirrup member mounted on said plate near the opposite side thereof from said pivot, said stirrup member including two spaced portions secured to said plate and an intermediate portion forming a guide for said carrier near the end thereof remote from said pivot, to confine said carrier against movement away from said plate while permitting it to oscillate in a plane parallel to said plate. 4. A construction as described in claim 2, in which said means for adjusting the position of said carrier includes a screw mounted on said plate for rotation with respect thereto and held against longitudinal movement with respect thereto, and a nut mounted on said screw and bearing against said carrier to determine the position of said carrier. 5. A boring head for use with a machine tool, including a disk-like plate and a shank formed integrally therewith and extending perpendicularly thereto, a pivot projecting from the face of said plate remote from said shank, said pivot being near one lateral edge of said plate, a carrier mounted on said pivot for oscillating movement across a portion of the face of said plate remote from said shank, a longitudinal groove in said plate and a transverse slot intersecting said groove, a screw mounted for rotation in said groove and having a graduated head mounted in said transverse slot and being held thereby against longitudinal movement, a nut mounted on said screw to travel thereon when said graduated head and said screw are turned, said nut having a portion bearing against said carrier at a point offset from said pivot to determine the position of said carrier, and means on said carrier for holding a boring tool so that said boring tool will be moved with respect to the axis of said shank when said carrier is oscillated to a different position. 6. A boring head for use with a machine tool, said head including a disk-like plate having a substantially flat and approximately circular forward face and having a rear face and a mounting shank projecting rearwardly from said rear face, the axis of said shank being substantially perpendicular to and concentric with said forward face of said plate, a carrier lying against said forward face of said plate and extending across said forward face in approximately diametrical relation thereto, said carrier being pivotally connected near one end thereof to said plate near one edge thereof so that said carrier may oscillate on the face of saidplate, a channel formed in said plate near an edge thereof opposite to the pivotal connection of said carrier to said plate, an adjusting screw mounted in said channel and operatively connected to said carrier to adjust the position of said carrier relative to said plate, and a socket on said carrier intermediate the ends thereof for holding a cutting tool. 7. A boring head for use with a machine tool, said head including a disk-like plate having a substantially flat and approximately circular forward face and having a rear face and a mounting shank projecting rearwardly from said rear face, ' the axis of said shank being substantially perpendicular to and concentric with said forward face of said plate, a carrier lying against said forward face of said plate and extending across said forward face in approximately diametrical relation thereto, said carrier being pivotally connected near one end thereof to said plate near one edge therof so that said carrier may oscillate on the face of said plate, a first channel formed in said plate near an edge thereof opposite to the pivotal connection of said carrier to said plate, an adjusting screw mounted in said channel and operatively connected to said carrier to adjust the position of said carrier relative to said plate, a socket on said carrier intermediate the ends thereof for holding a cutting tool, a second channel formed in said plate in a position intersecting said first channel and said adjusting screw, and a screw-operating member attached to said adjusting screw and lying partly in said second channel and projecting out of said second channel to an accessible position for manipulation. HOWARD C. GILLETTE. REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent: UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 971,120 Day Sept. 27, 1910 984,000 Hull Feb. 14, 1911 1,825,060 Hallenbeck Sept. 29, 1931 2,376,594 I-Iite May 22, 1945

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Cited By (1)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    US-2821402-AJanuary 28, 1958Peter A RasmussenLathe tool holder