Apparatus for heating sludge

Abstract

Claims

Feb. 20, 1951 'J. D. WALKER APPARATUS FOR HEATING SLUDGE Fild Feb. 7, 1948 sRAM/ LUDGE 'j ,-.mm Il Hgh-Iz: IlNlIll RAW Patented Feb. 20, 1.951 APPARATUS FOR HEATING SLUDGE James Donald Walker, Aurora, Ill., assignor to Walker Process Equipment, Inc., Aurora, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Application February 7, 1948, Serial No. 6,969 5 Claims. It has long been recognized that in sewage treating plants the action of the digesters is improved by heating the digester sludge to a temperature in the vicinity of 100 F. The most efficient way to heat such sludge has been to recirculate the sludge through a heat exchanger, passing any raw sludge through the heat exchanger also. 'I'he varying conditions have, however, resulted in rather erratic temperature control. According to the present invention the sludge is 'recirculated together with any raw sludge, through a heatexchanger and the supply of heat to the heat exchanger vis controlled by the temperature of sludge supplied to the heat exchanger.- Because of varying viscosity of the sludge, the ow rate of the sludge through the heat exchanger is not uniform. Accordingly, the supply of heat in exact proportion to the l heat requirements of the total volume of sludge passing through the heat exchanger may not be practicable. The present invention nevertheless produces an accommodation to the shock impulses of large quantities of raw sludge by controlling the heat input in response to a mixture of the raw sludge and some heated sludge recirculated directly from the outlet from the heat exchanger Without passing through the digester. This direct recirculation of sludge is also advantageous in maintaining a rapid movement of the sludge through the heat exchanger so as to substantially eliminate caking of the sludge within the heat exchanger. Additional objects and advantages of the invention'will be apparent from the following description and from the drawings, in which: Figure 1 is a somewhat diagrammatic fragmentary side View, partly in section, of the apparatuschosen for illustration of this invention. - AFig.f2 is a fragmentary plan View of part of the apparatus seen in Fig. 1, also partly diagrammatic. Although the law requires av full and exact description of at least one form of the invention, such as that which follows, it is, of course, the purpose of a patent to cover each new inventive concept therein no matter how it may later be disguised by variations in form or additions of further improvements; and vthe appended claimsare intended to accomplish this purpose by particularly pointing out the parts, improvementsor combinations in which the inventive concepts are found. The apparatus of this invention has been shown in conjunction with `a sludge digester II and a boiler I2, neither of which when considered alone comprises a part of the present invention. The boiler I2 may be heated in any manner,V preferably having a burner adapted to use either oil or gas and being automatically controlled to maintain water in the boiler at a predetermined temperature. An important part of the apparatus of the present invention is the heat exchanger indicated generally by I3. In the illustrated form of the invention this heat exchanger has been mounted Within a housing I 4 which neatly covers both the boiler I2 and the heat exchanger I3 andv which furnishes some joint insulation for both of them. The heat exchanger I3 may be located entirely outside of the boiler housing I4 and the boiler and heat exchanger may be separately' insulated. The heat exchanger includes a jacket I6 surrounding an inner pipe I'I. Hot water from the boiler I2 is supplied to the space between the jacket I6 and the pipe I'I. Sludge to be heated is passed through the pipe or conduit ll.- Both the sludge-heating conduit Il and the jacket IS comprise a plurality of sections. The . successive sections of the conduit I'I are connected by return bends I8 and the successive sections of the jacket are connected by pipes I9. The return bends I8 are of course removable and their removal gives access to the sludge"- heating conduit Il for cleaning, although cleaning is rarely necessary with proper practice o j the present invention. Raw sludge is received by the apparatus of this invention through raw sludge supply conduit 2 I. Sludge is drawn from the digester I I lthrough return supply conduit 22. Through tting 23 these conduits communicate with the intakerend of the heat exchanger. The output or hot end of the heat exchanger communicates with a sludge pump 24, the outlet of which communicates with dischargeconduits '26 and 21. vThe Ydischarge conduit 2.6 Vis also connected to lthe jacket I6 by a pump 34. The inlet of the pump 34 may be connected by a pipe 36 to the cold end of the jacket, namely the end at which the sludge enters. The outlet of the pump 34 is connected by a pipe 3T to the lower portion of boiler I2 to return the cooled Water to the boiler for heating. The outlet of pump 34 is also connected by a pipe 38 to one inlet of blending valve 39. The other inlet of blending valve 39 is connected by a pipe 42 to the upper portion of boiler I2 to receive heated water therefrom. The outlet of blending valve 39 is connect-ed by a pipe 4| to the hot end of the jacket I6. The blending valve regulates the proportion of hot Water from pipei2 and cooled water from pipe 38 which is delivered to pipe 4I, thereby regulating the temperature of the Water delivered to the heat exchanger. The blending valve 39 is controlled by a thermostatic unit 43 which is preferably locatedapproximately as shown If there were no raw sludge being supplied,` the thermostat 53 would be responsive to the temperature of recirculated'sludge passing through valve 23; In that event the blending valve would control the output temperature of the sludge fairly accurately. It has been found, however, that when the control of heat is responsive to the temperature oi the heated sludge only, there are wide variations in the temperature of the heated sludge due primarily to the fact' that When a shock load of raw sludge is supplied no additional heat will be called for until this raw sludge has passed through the heat exchanger to the position of the thermostatic device. Hence the raw sludge which has thus passe-d through the heater is inadequately heated and enters the digester at an undesirably low temperature. According to the present invention the heat' control is made responsive to the temperature of' sludge about to be supplied to the heat exchanger. The rate or"A supply of the sludge, the rate of its circulation through the heat exchanger, varies considerably with the consistency of the sludge. Hence it often is not practicable to make the heat supply directly proportional to the heat deficiency of the entering sludge. The location shown for the thermostatic device 3' has been found to be a very satisfactory position in that it is responsive both to the temperature of the heated sludge and to the temperature of shock loads of raw sludge. When a shock load of raw sludge is supplied through conduit 2i, the thermostatic device43 immediately controls blending valve 3S to connect pipe 42 solely or primarily to pipe 4! so that more heat is supplied to the jacket I6 than Would otherwise have been the case. Although the controls for blending valve 39 may take many forms, one suitable form is the combination of Minneapolis-Honeywell models No. K903A for proportioning controls, associated directly7 with the control valve, and No. T915C as the remote bulb device e3, with an adjustable temperature range from 65 to 140 F. With such a proportioning type of control arranged as indicated, the adjustment should be such that the heat would not be shut oil until the temperature at the bulb 43 is considerably above that really desired for the sludge leaving the heat exchanger. Otherwise, with no raw sludge being received, the recirculated sludge would cut oli all heat supply and no correction would be ma-de in time to prevent the discharge of considerable under-heated sludge. `'-Witl'r the recirculation provided according-to i this invention, it is unlikely that there will be much adhesion of particles to the inside of the heat exchanger pipes. It is preferred, however, that a high frequency vibrator be attached to these pipes, perhaps at a mid-point of the total length, to set up vibrations in the Walls of the pipes which will act to prevent such adhesion. Apparently the solid particles 'are bounced away from the Walls of the pipe by the vibrations, or repelled therefrom by Wave action Without contact with the wall. Any frequency found to prevent adhesion may be used. It is believed that this will also give a better rate oi' heat exchange. I claim: l`. Apparatus for heating sludge including a heat exchanger having a sludge-heating conduit, jacket means surrounding the sludge-heating conduit, a raw sludge supply conduit and a return supply conduit from a digesterboth communieating with the inlet or the sludge-heating conduit and a discharge conduit connecting the outlet of the sludge-heating conduit andA said' digester, a by-pass conduit connected betweenthe discharge conduit and the raw sludge supply conduit, a sludge-circulating pump connected in said= conduits in a position to pump the sludge through thesludge-heating conduit and from the sludge-` heating conduit both to said digester andl separately through the by-pass conduit, a blending valve having its outlet communicating Withthe end of the jacket adjacent the outlet of the sludge conduit and having its inlets communicating with a source of heated liquid, and with a; by-pass pipe communicating with both the other end of the jacket and the return pipe to: said source of heated liquid, a recirculating pump. connected to cause the liquid from the jacket` tor circulate through the source of heated liquid or' through the by-pass pipe in accordance with the control by said blending valve, and thermostatic means controlling said blending' valve and including a temperature-responsive element situatedto be responsive to the temperature of the mixture' of raw sludge and sludge frornfthe by-pass conduit which is about to enter the heat exchanger.- 2. Apparatus for heating sludge including a heat exchanger having a sludge-heating conduit, jacket means surrounding the sludge-heating conduit, a raw sludge supply conduit and a return supply conduit from a digester, both communieating with the inlet of the sludge-heating conduit and a dscharge conduit connecting the outlet of the sludge-heating conduit and said digester, a by-pass conduit connected between the discharge conduit and the raw sludge supply con-- duit, a sludge-circulating pump connected in said conduits in a position to pump the sludge through the sludge-heating conduit and from the sludgeheating conduit both to said digester and separately through the ley-pass conduit,v and means for controlling the supply of'heat to the `jacket thermostatically in response to temperatureof the mixture of raw sludge and sludge fromv the by-pass conduit which is about to enter the'heat exchanger. 3. Apparatus for heating sludge includingv a heat exchanger having a sludge-heating conduit, jacket means surrounding the sludge-heating conduit, a raw sludge supply conduit and a return supply conduit from a digester, both communi-i cating With the inlet of the sludge-heating''cori-l duit and a discharge conduit connecting the outlet of the sludge-heating conduit and said digester, and means to control the supply of heat '75 to the jacket thermostatically. in joint response 5 to the temperature of the raw sludge and the temperature of the heated sludge from the sludge-heating conduit. 4. Apparatus for heating sludge including a heat exchanger having a sludge-heating conduit, jacket means surrounding the sludge-heating conduit, a raw sludge supply conduit and a return supply conduit from a digester, both communicating with the inlet of the sludge-heating conduit and a discharge conduit connecting the outlet of the sludge-heating conduit and said digester, and means to control the supply of heat to the jacket thermostatically in part at least, in response to the temperature of sludge about to enter the sludge-heating conduit. 5. Apparatus for heating sludge including a heat exchanger having a sludge-heating conduit, jacket means surrounding the sludge-heating conduit, a raw sludge supply conduit and a return supply conduit from a digester, both communieating with the inlet of the sludge-heating conduit and a discharge conduit connecting the outlet of the sludge-heating conduit and said digester, a by-pass conduit connected between the discharge conduit and the raw sludge supply con- 25 2,282,013 6 duit, a sludge-circulating pump connected in said conduits in a position to pump the sludge both to said digester and through the by-pass conduit, a heat supply valve having its outlet communieating with the end of the jacket adjacent the outlet of the sludge conduit and having an inlet communicating with a source of heated liquid, and thermostatic means controlling said heat supplyI Valve and including a temperature-responsive element situated to be responsive to temperature of the mixture of raw sludge and sludge from the by-pass conduit which is about to enter the heat exchanger. JAMES DONALD WALKER. REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent: UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,847,589 Brobeck Mar. 1, 1932 2,190,598 Fischer Feb. 13, 1940 2,197,118 Astle Apr. 16, 1940 Wetzsteon May 5, 1942

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Patent Citations (4)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    US-1847589-AMarch 01, 1932Brobeck ArnoldMethod of heating cellulose digesting liquors
    US-2190598-AFebruary 13, 1940Dorr Co IncDigestion of sewage sludge
    US-2197118-AApril 16, 1940Astle WilliamHeat transfer apparatus
    US-2282013-AMay 05, 1942Raymond V WetzsteonAir conditioning system

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Cited By (3)

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    DE-1246610-BAugust 03, 1967Hans Roediger Dr Ing, Walter RoedigerVorrichtung zur Beschickung eines Faulbehaelters in Klaeranlagen
    US-2847379-AAugust 12, 1958Chicago Pump CoMethod and apparatus for treating sewage sludge
    US-4230580-AOctober 28, 1980Commonwork Enterprises LimitedSlurry digester and capping arrangement for use therein