Seed delinter

Abstract

Claims

July 14, 1953 Filed Sept. 3. 1948 L. A. PAZANDAK 2,644,986 SEED DELINTER 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 101113 A. Pazanaai an LU ZT MMFLUIEW J "Em July 14, 1953 PA ANDAK 2,644,986 snap mum Filed Sept. a. 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 5 584: son I. I MMHWWWW r 4 ma nmnnmln a ENE-:1 1021113 A Pazmzab/I Patented July 14, 1953 "by mesne assignments, to The Buckeye Cotton Oil Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, a corporation j of Ohio 1 Application September 3, 1948, Serial No. 47,694 19 Claims. This invention relates to a machine and a process for ginning and for delinting cotton seeds; and has for its principal object the provision of a simple and efiicient machine of the rotating brush type. I The brush type of ginning and delinting machines as heretofore constructed have not proved practical, typical shortcomings of these machines including one or more of the following, inefficient delinting performance, contaminated lint, excessive breakage of seed, incomplete separation of lint from delinted seed, inadequate control of the degree of delinting, tendency to clog, and inechanical defects and complexities. 'I 'he saw type of delinter causes chipping andscaling of small particles from the outer pigment layer of the seedcoat and even removes portions of the palisade cell layer. As a 'resultthe lint is unduly contaminated with hull pepper. These and other defects of prior delinting machines are minimized or eliminated in'machines embodying the principles of the present invention. proximate average number of seed. The invention also provides for regulating the duration and extent-of the delinting action of the bristles upon the average cottonseed subjected to the process, by limiting the apof spiral circuits traveled by seed while in the delinting zone. The preferred machine of my invention comprises a cylindrical disposed brush having outwardly extending and durable yet flexible bristles, preferably of a' springy nature, said brush being adapted to be rotated. at ahigh speed within a cylindrical housing the interior surface of which, is at least partially lined with a resilient material which most desirably has relatively. high surface friction, such as rubber, the bristle tips of the rotating brush clearing the inner surface of the lining material by an amount sufiicient for the passage of seed therebetween, means for continu- Another object of the invention is to provide a machine for producing planting seed of improved quality, virtually free from lint and fuzz which interfere with accurate spacing of seed in machine planting, and 'also virtually free from defects in the seed coat which tend to impair uniform germination. In general, my invention provides for and pro; motes repeated andcontrolled contact between linty cottonseed and the tips of durable bristles under conditions of relative movement sufficiently. great to dislodge individual lint fibersfrom the seed coat when a bristle tip collides with a'se'ed at or near a fiber root. I'accomplish this by caus ing the seed to move in agenera'lly spiral path within an annular delintingzone, on the inner portion of which are brush bristles'traveling in a circular path at a high peripheral speed. The outer surface of the delinting zone, beingyielclable, confines the rapidly moving seed; (impelled outward by the blowsof the moving bristles) within the delinting zone without breakage, and repeatedly and yieldably urges the seed into renewed contact with the moving bristle tips. The invention furthermore provides for the removal of the lint fibers thus dislodged from theseeddnf ously feeding linty seed into one endofthe cylindrical housing, a delinted seedfoutlet at its other end, means for causing the seed to work their way (at a predetermined or adjustable rate) from the seed inlet to the seed outlet while subjecting them to vigorous delinting action as they are carried along in a generally spiral path in the annular space between the resilient lining and the bristle tips of the rotating'brush, and means for removing the lint fibers thus dislodged from the housing through aseries of non-clogging openings in its wall extending substantially the full. length of the brush cylinder. The following "description of an exemplary model of a delinting machine incorporating the novel features of the invention will serve to impart a better understanding of the general nature of the machine and process defined in the accompanying claims. It is to be understood that this more. detailed disclosure isnierely illustrative, and is in no sense limiting, numerous changes in "a design and arrangementof parts being permis such a manner as to avoid entanglement I or. snarling of fibers, or their contamination with} seed particles, or loss of lint. This is accom.--' plished by the provision of a substantially non.- clogging series of lint outlets so located with re... spect to the'bristle tips as to permit the'quick escape;of ,the. dislodged fibers through the. outer, wall of the annular space, while preventing escape sible within the scope of the invention. 'In the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification; Fig. 1 as top plan view ofa'cottonseed delinting machine in which the features and characterist'ics of the invention are incorporated; Fig. 2' is 'anenlarged transverse sectional view I the mac es? F 1f Fig: 3 is a fragmentary sectional view taken as on irregularline 3- 3 in.Fig.2; and Figs is a longitudinalsectional View, parts I beingomitted, taken as; on line 4-4 in Fig 2. The, cott0ns eed delinting machine-illustrated infthe drawings comprises a casing it having a, cylindrical wall: l5 and end walls II and i2, se-' of the end wall .I l. A shaft 22, extending longitudinally of the cylindrical wall 15, is rotatably mounted, as indicated at 23 and 24, in the end walls H and I2, respectively. Spaced apart nuts, designated 25 and 26, respectively, upon the shaft 22 are engagedagainst inner surfaces of the endwalls H and I2 to preclude possibility of movement of said shaft in direction longitudinally of the casing ID. .A portion of said shaft 22 extending outwardly of the end wall l2 fixedly supports a pulley 21 through the instrumentality of which the shaft may be rotated. A portion of the longitudinally extending shaft 22 adjacent the nut 26-and the end wall 12 fixedly supports a feeding brush 28 of -multiple disc construction which is situated within the casing at location beneath the hopper l9. More explicitly, the disc shaped feeding brush 28 is made up of bristles arranged at right angle relation to the shaft 22 and fixed to a hub 29 which in turn is fixed upon said shaft 22. The bristles of said feeding brush 28 terminate at equal distance from the longitudinal axis of the shaft 22. In the disclosure as made, the hub 29 is in engaged relation with the nut 26. These bristles, and also those of the delinting brushes 30, may be of any sufficiently durable yet flexible bristle material, such as'steel wire, brass wire, or the like, preferably of springy nature. Wires having diameters ranging from about 8/1000 to about 40/1000 inch are suitable for the purpose (preferred diameters being about 12/1000 to 20/1000 inch), and bristle lengths of about one inch to about'3 inches'or even more may advantageously be used. As previously noted, the clearance between bristle tips and the interior surface of the housing lining is suflicient for the passage of seed therebetween. Owing to the flexibility of the bristles and the compressibility of the resilient lining, this clearance may be substantially less than the diameter of a seed on its shorter axis, which is about one-fourth inch. On'the other hand, this clearance maybe more than one seed diameter, although in general the delinting capacity of the machine decreases as the clearance increases above that corresponding to one seed diameter. The whole of the length of said longitudinally extending shaft 22 between the hub 23 and the nut 25 fixedly supports delinting brushes-30 made up of radially extending bristles fixed to a hub 3|, the bristle clusters of which may be arranged in disc construction, situated within said casing l0 and arranged in proximate relation to each other. The expressions feeding brush and delinting brush are used more or less arbitrarily, the so-called feeding brush having a delinting function as well as a feeding function, and the so called delinting brushes 30 having also a feeding function. y In an elongated rectilinear portion or opening 32 of cylindrical wall [5, extending longitudinally substantially the .full length of the delinting brush cylinder, there are provided a series of closely spaced narrow lint outlet openings 32a, each of these openings extending some distance (usually several inches) in a circumferential direction, these narrow openings being interconnected at their trailing ends as will be made clear in what follows. The ,narrow circumferentially directed lint outlet openings 32a are separated from one another over the greater part of their length by the spaced apart parallel fingers 37, each having its inner surface formed in the shape of an arc of substantially the same radius as that of the inner surface of cylindrical wall l5. The upperend, or leading end (i. e. the end first approached by a point on the revolving brush) of each arcuate finger 31 is secured, as at 38, to wall |5 adjacent the upper edge of the opening 32, as indicated in Fig. 2 and Fig. 3. Each arcuate finger extends in the direction of rotation of the brush and may extend slightly inwardly as shown, and the lower end, or trailing end, portion 39 of each arcuate finger 31 is unsecured and terminates substantially flush with the interior surface of the lining material of the housing and slightly out of contact with the housing wall at the lower edge of opening 32. The construction and arrangement will be such that the spaced apart, parallel fingers 3! together with the elongated rectilinear opening portion 32 in the cylindrical wall l5 will constitute a substantially non-clogging screening instrumentality through which lint can pass but seed cannot. Such lint fibers or strands as may straddle one of the fingers 31 will be moved along towards and finally off of its trailing end by advancing seed impelled by the revolving brush, and/or by air currents generated by the brush, thus overcoming any tendency to clog the narrow lint discharge openings. A hood 33 may be arranged to overhang this series of lint outlet openings so as to cause the escaping lint to collect and drop from the underside of this hood. An upper part of the hood 33 is integrally orrigidly secured, as at 34, to the cylindrical wall l5 along an upper side 35 of the rectilinear portion 32, and said hood 33 extends downwardly and outwardly from said upper side 35 and is open at its lower Side 36. Instead of employing this hood, one may connect the series of lint outlet-openings to the suc tion of a lint collecting system; preferably providing a mote (or trash) collecting zone adjacent and below the'series of lint outlet openings in accordance with conventional lint cleaning practice. Those portions of the interior surface of the cylindrical wall l5 which surround delinting brushes 30 fixedly support spaced apart, longitudinally disposed, parallel lining ribs or strips 40 which extend along said cylindrical wall l5 from about the location of the first of the brushes 30, adjacent to the feeding brush 28, to the end wall H having the outlet 2| and the chute 20. The feeding brush 28 and the delinting brushes 30, together with the shaft 22, are adapted to be rotated in the direction of the arrow, as shown in Fig. 2 of the drawings, and the leading or advance edge portion ll of each of the strips 4lldesirablyis beveled as shown. An. upper portion of the interior surface of 'the cylindrical wall [5 adjacent the elongated rectilinear lint outlet portion 32 fixedly supports spaced apart, obliquely or angularly disposed lining strips 42 all of which extend along said cylindrical wall 15 from about the location of the first oi the brushes 30, adjacent to the feed ing brush 28, and some of which extend to the location of end wall II. The strips 42 diverge slightly from one another and from the parallel strips 40, from a comparatively close spacing at the seed inlet end to a wider spacing at the seed outlet end of the cylinder, their direction of slant tending slightly towards the spiral direction of seed travel. The forward or advance edge portion 43 of each of said strips 42 is desirably beveled asv shown. The strip 42 next adjacent to the spaced'apart, parallel strips 40 diverges therefrom in direction toward the end wall ll. w A lower portion of the interior surface of the cylindrical wall I5, as well as a side portion thereof opposite the hopper I9- and an upper portion thereof adjacent to said hopper, fixedly supports spaced apart, parallel, angularly disposed feeding strips 44 which extend along'said cylindrical wall I5 from the location of the end wall 12 to the locations of the adjacent ends of the spaced apart, parallel strips 40. The feeding strips 44 slant in the same direction with respect to the direction of rotation of the feeding brush 28 as do the strips 42 with respect to the j direction of rotation of the feeding and delinting brushes 30. s The spaced apart, parallel, angularly disposed feeding strips 44 and the feeding brush 28" are adapted cooperatively to engage cotton seeds with cotton thereon placed in the hopper I9 and force them toward the spaced apart longitudinally extending, parallel lining strips 40. Adjacent said strips 40 the bristle tips of the delinting brushes 30 are adapted to engage the more or less linty cotton seed and cause lint or fuzz to be removed therefrom. The spaced apart, angularly disposed strips 42 and said delinting brushes 30 are adapted cooperatively to en age the cotton seed both to force them to.- ward the end wall H and to cause lint or fuzz to be removed therefrom. It will be apparent that the construction and arrangement are such that linty cotton seed placed in'said hopper 19 will be fed along the cylindrical wall l5, from right to left in Figs. 1 and 4 of the drawings, in a generally spiral path. All of the strips 40, 42, and M desirably can consist of rubber of either natural or synthetic origin, orother material having rubber-like compressibility and resiliency, and preferably havinggood abrasion resistance and a high rubber-like coefficient of friction. a As hereinbefore stated, the shaft 22,with,the brushes 28 and 30 rotates in the direction indicated by the arrow in Fig. 2. Linty cotton seed, when droppedinto the hopper 19, will be fed through cooperative action of the feedi brush 28 and'the feeding strips 44 to adjacent end portions of the lining strips 40. Rotationof the delinting brushes 30 will cause eachlinty cotton seed to be moved transversely of the strips All, first against the beveled edge portions 4!, and then over the strips 40 andinto contact with the bristles. seed will be advanced to the position of the foremost angularly disposed strip 42, and continued over and fed slightly along the strips 42 in dig Each cotton seed rection toward the outlet 2|. again will be moved and carried acrossthe series of strips 40 in a subsequent circuit :of the- In the course of each circuit around the interior of the cylinder, eachcotton .39 by the motion of these seed. - into contactwiththe bristle tips. of one or agroup of the rapidly rotating bristles less free of lint,eventually will reach the location of the outlet 2| and pass from the machine by way of the chute 20. As the bristles ofbrushcs 30, and the seed which they sweep along with them, pass the spaced apart, parallel fingers 31, which may appropriately have a diameter of about T33 of an inch, any cotton, lint or fuzz which lodges upon or between any of said fingers 31 viswiped off of their free, lower end portions The shaft 22 of the delinter is connected by suitable means, e.*g. pulley 21 and a suitable belt, with a prime mover adapted to rotate the shaft at high speed A speed of 900 to 1000 R. P. M. has been found quite eifective with a brush cylinder 10 inches in diameter, although these speeds are by'no means limiting. A peripheral speed of at least about 2000 feed per minute is recommended, and a somewhat higher speed is preferred, with the delinter illustrated' in the drawings. For modifications of this delinter e'mploying other bristle spacings or other diameters or other clearances, speeds somewhat above or below this range may be found desirable. In its operation my delinter serves to dislodge the lint fibers from the seed by the impact of the tips of the flexible bristles, under the existing conditions of rapid relative motion between seed and bristle tips. 7 Whereas this rapid motion would be expected to result in significantly objectionable breakage of at least some of the somewhat fragile seeds, I substantially avoid this by my novel provision of yieldable means of restricting motion of the seed away from the bristles and of urging the seed againinto contact with the bristles. This is accomplished by completely or'partially lining the interior of cylindrical wall I5.-with resilient material having effective surface frictional characteristics, such as rubber, Where- H by rapidly moving seeds are yieldably restrained without damage and are repeatedly urged back- Upon contact against a seed, theseed moves tangentially, and at high speed toward the housing wall. The spacing of the resilient lining stripsfor of longi-' tudinal ridges on the lining if-it is continuous, is ' appropriately s'uch that a seed moving tangenwill strikethe'base of the next strip or ridge, and'will then be caused to move up and over this next strip or ridge into its next contact with. is to line the'interiorof the brush housing with a tially from contact with the brush at a, point opposite the crown ofone. lining strip or ridge the brush. 1 I .ICjne convenient manner of providing. a longitudinally ridged,v yet eifectively continuous lining series ofpartiallyoverlapping strips of rubber orother suitable material, each strip extendingsubstantially the length of the vdelinting 'zone and overlapping the adjacent strip for a fraction of an inch, with its'exposed edge away from the direction of seed approach. The character of the lintremovalmeans of my cottonseed delinter is unique,and is of great importance in obtaining commercially desirable grades of lint of high quality. It facilitates the escape from the delinting zone of each individual lint fiber almost immediately after its dislodgement from the seed, and thus minimizes damage to the fiber, or tangling and snarling of groups of fibers such as tends to occur from prolonged presence of lint in the crowded and turbulent delinting zone. Furthermore it permits'segregating the lint removed from the .seed in the initial stages of the process (near the seed inlet .end of the machine) from the lint removed in later stages, simply by subdividing the lint collecting zone or duct, outside the lint outlet portion '32 of the housing, into two or 'more zones eachleading to a separate lint collecting station. The seed delinting capacity of a given machine depends upon the average number of spiral circuits traveled, by individual seeds in their path from seed inlet to seed outlet within the delinting zone. In general the capacity .of.:machine, in weight of seed delinted per unit of time, is decreased by increasing the number of circuits traveled by a typical seed; and at thesametime the yield of lint removed, per unit'weight of seed subjected to treatment, tends'to increase, within obvious limits. It is of considerable importance to design the machine so that the lint yield .obtained will be as great or as little as desired, and so that the seed delinting capacity will be as high as isconsistent with the desired lint yield. These yield and capacity requirements may be predetermined, and built into a given machine, or provision may be made for adjusting these'factors (actually by suitably varying the total number of circuits traveled by the average seed) after the machine is assembled, and even while it is in operation if desired. Two principal variables may be utilized in the machine of this invention 'for controlling the seed throughput rate, andinversely the lint yield, the first being the degree of slant of one or more of the lining'strips or'ridges on the lining, and the second being the slope of the axis of the machine. The machine specifically illustrated herein is mounted horizontally, and the seed throughput rate under a given set of operating conditions depends upon the number of obliquely disposed lining strips 42 and the degree of slant of each of these. The same throughput rate may alternatively be obtained by slanting all of the lining strips a very slight amount, less than the slant shown 'for strips 42. Alternatively, all but one or all but a very few of the lining strips may be mounted parallel to the axis of the cylinder, and one or two of the strips (preferably next adjacent the edge 38, Fig. 2, of the lint outlet) may be sub divided into a series of separate short strips, each mounted to the housing by means of a bolt and lock nut in a manner permitting easy adjustment of its direction of slant. Such an arrangement permits one to adjust the rate 01 longitudinal advance of the seed differently in different portions of the machine, which is helpful in adjusting the delinting load so thatit will be uniformly distributed over the length of the brush. Instead of relying on directional lining strips for determining and regulating throughput rate and lint yield, one may utilize the force of gravity as the principal means, or as an auxiliary means, for controlling these end results. Thus the axis of the machine may be disposed vertically, with the seed taking a downward path (retarded, if desired, by directional lining strips slanted away from the spiral direction-of seed travel), or on a downwardslope. The axis may even be disposed on an upward slope if suitable directional lining strips are provided so as to advance the seed towards the seed outlet. In addition to directional lining strips and the slope of the axis of the machine, a number of other 'factors influence the seed throughput rate and the comparative lint yield, including clearance between brush and housing, rotational speed of brush, character and spacing of bristles, and nature of the lining surface. In this last named connection, it is :noteworthy that one advantage of a lining made of rubber is that its frictional characteristics have adesirable restraining effect upon what otherwise might be a tendency of the seed to move so fast circumferentially within the delinting zone that the impact of the moving bristles would be ineffective for dislodging lint from the seed coat. While I have specifically described a modification of my invention which'includes a horizontal and truly (cylindrical brush and housing, mounted coaxially, and other specific details of design, it is understood that other'arrangements andother features which are of record in the art of delinting cotton seed by brush action, or which are obvious to skilled cottonseed millers, may advantageously be employed in conjunction with the improvements herein described and claimed. Thus if one chooses to employ a vertical arrangement ofbrushand housing, as proposed in McCormick Patent 1,020,108, it is obvious that this will permit one to feed the seed into the upper end of the annular space, formed between the brush and the housing, .over the full 360 of this annulus, thus favoring uniformity of seed distribution in the -.delinting .zone. Then too, one may employ a brush and housing which are slightly tapered, instead of being truly cylindrical, as proposed by Collyer inPatent 408,085 and by Hawk in Patent 1,041,468, this being an arrangement which readily permits varying the clearance between bristle tips and the inner surface or surfaces of the lining material by adjusting the longitudinal position of the brush within .the housing. Such adjustment may ,be made to compensate for wear of bristles, and also as .an independent control of throughput rate and lint yield. Similarly, the brush construction may be varied, for example to provide considerable distances between adjacent gguislgf bristles asillustrated in de Massas Patent In the .following claims the terms lint and linters are usedin the broad sense, to refer generally to the cellulosic fibers found on unginned cottonseed .as well as the comparatively short residual fibers left on the seed following the conventional ginning operation. Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: 1. A cottonseed delinting machine comprising a substantially cylindrical casing, said casing being at least partially lined with a rubbery, nonmetallic, resilient, friction exerting material havmg a compressibility and elasticity sufficient to prevent seed breakage and to urge the seed repeatedly back into contact with the moving bristle tips, a brush supported for rotation within and on an axis extending lengthwise of said casing, said brush 'havingbristles of a length such as to prov1de an annular passage between the bristle passage between the bristlertips :and the casing, means for causing said: brushtorotate at; a'high peripheral speed. said .casingi-beingat.least partially lined with arubbery, non-metallic, resilient friction exerting ma'terialhavingacompressh bility and elasticity sufificientatoiprevent.seed breakage and to urgetheseedrepeatedly back into contact withthe moving bristle ,tips'and have. in a iinty see ,inletationesendland :a, delintedseed outle a he ot erencl, me ns carried bysaid casing and extendinginto. saidannular for causing theseedto follow a generally spiral path within said passage understheaction of, said, brush from seed iniet to seed, "blot, and a series of narrow lint discharg opening full length or saidcylin icallydisposed brush. 3. A cottonseed delinting machinecomprising a cylindrical casing, a brush supported for rota: tion within and substantially n the axis of said casing, said brush'having"bristles.of alength, such as to providefan annular passage between thebristle tips and zthecasing, means for causing said brush to "rotate at said casing having alint i n h r rieh e n ed seed inlet at one end and'a delinted seedloutltet at the titer end, and a series or narrow transverse lint discharge slits, in the cylindrical wall, adjacent beiniginter l connected at their trailing ends and being separated by circumferentially directed fingers fixed to the cylindrical wall at theirleadi ng ends only extending substantially the full, saidseries of slits J I 7 length of said. cylindrically. disposed brush, 1 4. A cottonseed 'delinting' machine comprising a cylindrical casin $aidscasing being at least partially lined with "rubber, a brush supported H for rotation within and on an axis extending lengthwise of said casing, said brush having bristlesof a length such as to provide an annular passage between the bristletips and the casing, means for causing said brush to rotate at a high peripheral speed, said casing having a' linty seed inlet atone end and a delinted seed outlet at the other end, said rubber lining being formedto provide ridges disposed generally lengthwiseof said casing and extending into :said' annular passage for causing the seed to follow a generally spiral path within said passage under theaction of said brush from seed inlet'to seed outlet, and a series of narrow lint discharge 'dpenings" the cylindrical wall, said series extending 'substaptially the full length of said cylindrically disposed brush. 5. A cottonseed delinting machine comprising a cylindrical casing, a brush supported for rotation within and on an axis extending lengthwise of said casing, said brush having bristles of a length such as to provide an annular passage between the bristle tips and the casing, means for causing said brush to rotate at a high pen t e 'y li-.., cal wall, said series extending substantially the, ' ticmaterial mountedon the interior of said casing intermediate said seed inlet and seed outlet," and a plurality of generallycircumferentially, extending fingers-fixed to said casing at their ing and extending into said annular passage; said ribs extending generallylengthwiseof saidcasing and beinginclined, as they approach the seed outlet end, slightly in the direction of brush rotation, whereby the seed is causedto follow a generally "spiral path'within said'passage under the action-of said brush fromseed-inlet to :seed outlet; and a series of narrow transverse lintdischarge openings in the cylindrical wall, said series extendingsubstantially the full length of said cylindrically disposed brush. 6-.- A cottonseed delinting machine comprising" a cylindrical casing at least partially lined with rubber, a brush supported for rotation within and on an axis extending lengthwise of" said casing, said brush having bristles of a length such as to provide anannular passage between the bristle tips and the casing, means for causing said brush to rotate at a high peripheral speed, said'casing having a linty seed inlet at one end and a delinted seed outlet at the other endfsaid casing-having an elongated lint discharge openleading ends only and extending substantially across said opening, saidfingers being spaced provide a series of lint discharge slits'of lesswidththan a cottonseed. axially of said casing to 7. A cottonseed delinting machine comprising a cylindrical casing, a brush supported for rotation' within and'substantially onthe axis of said ripheral speed, said casing having a linty seed casing, said brush having bristles or tending substantially across said'opening, said fingers being freeattheir trailing'endsandbeing' spaced axially of said casing to provide a series" of lint discharge slits of less width than a cottonseed,said' discharge opening and fingers extending substantially the entire length of said brush. 8. A cottonseed delinting machine comprising a cylindrical casing, a brush supported for rotation within and substantially onthe axis of said casing, said brush having bristles of a length such as to provide an annular passage between the bristle tips and the casing, means for rotatj ing said brush at a high peripheral speed, said. casing having a linty seed inlet at one end and, a delinted seed outlet at the other end, said casv ing having an interior. lining ofrubber having ribs formed thereon, said ribs being so directed] astocause the seed to move longitudinally of the casing within said annular passage from seed inlet to seed outlet while partaking of rotational movement imparted by the brush, said casing having an elongatedlint discharge opening intermediate said seed inlet and seed outlet, and a plurality of generally circumferentially ex tending fingers fixed to said casing at their leading ends only and extending across said opening, said fingers being spaced axially of said casing to provide a series of lint discharge slits of less width than a cotton seed. 9.'A cottonseed delinting machine comprising a' substantially cylindrical casing, a brush sup a length "such as toprovide an annular passage between the bristle tips'and the'casing, means for 1caus' ing said brush to rotate at a highperipherali speed, said 'casing havingadinty seed inlet at oneend'aiid-a delinted seed outlet at the other end, said*casing having an elongated lint dis- 11 ported for rotation withinfand on an. axieextend; ing lengthwise of said casing, saidbrush having bristles of a length such as to provide an annular and having a linty seed inlet at oneend and a delinted seed outlet at the other end, means carried by said casing and. extending into. said. annular passage for causing the seed to follow a generally spiral path within said passage under the action of said brush fromseed inlet to seed. outlet, and a lint discharge opening in the cy lindrical wall extending substantially the full length of said cylindricallydispo sed.brush, 10. A cottonseed delinting machine comprising. a cylindrical casing, a brush-.s ipported f or rotation within and on an axis extending lengthwise of said casing, said brush haying bristlesof, a. length such as to provide an annular. passage between the bristle. tips and the'casing, means. for causing said brush to rotate at a highperipheral speed, said casing having a linty seedinlet at one end and a delinted seed outlet. at the other end, elongated ribs of deformable elastic material mounted on the interior of said casing and extending, into said annular passage, said ribs extending generally lengthwise of said casing and being inclined, as they approach the seed outlet end, slightly in the direction of brush rotation, whereby the seed is caused to follow a generally spiral path within said passage under the action of said brush from seed inletto seed, outlet, said casing having an elongated lint charge opening intermediate said seed; inlet and. seed outlet, and a plurality o fgenerally circumferentially extending fingers fixed to said-casing at their leading ends only andextending substantially across said opening, said fingersbeing, spaced axially of said casing, to; provide a; series of lint dischargeslits. of lesswidththan: acotton seed. 11. A cotton seed delinting machine;comprising a cylindrical casing, a brush supported for rota; tion within and substantially on the axisrzof said casing, said brush having bristles-oi a length, such as to provide an annular passage between the bristle tipsv and the caSing rneansfor. causing said. brush to rotate at a high peripheral speed, said casing being at least'partially lined with a; rubbery, non-metallic, resilient friction. exertingmaterial having a compressibility and: elasticitysufiicient. to prevent seed breakage and tourge the seed repeatedly back into contact with the, moving bristle tips and havingalinty seed'inlet; at one end and. a delinted seed outlet-at the other 7 end, and. a non-clogging lint discharge. opening in the cylindrical wall extending. substantially the full length of said cylindrically disposed. brush. 12. The machine of claim 3, wherein the trailing. ends of said fingers are nofurther from the axis of the machine than is the inner surface of the lining of the casing. 13. The machine of claim 11, wherein the resilient lining. comprises spaced apart longitudinally disposed strips of rubber-like material. 14. The machine of claim 13, wherein the leading edges of said strips are beveled. 15. The machineof claim 13,, wherein the major portion of the strips are parallel to the horizontal axis of the; machine, and the re.- mainder of the lining, strips are slightly inclined in the direction of. brush rotation and seed travel. 16. The machine of claim 1, in which the brush is made of springy wire bristles: from about 8 to about 40 thousandths inch in diameter and about 1 to 3' inches long. I 17. The machine or. claim 1, in which the brush 1 rotating means turns the brush at a peripheral speed of at least 2000 feet per minute. 18. A machine for delinting cotton seeds and for separating the cotton seeds from lint removed therefrom, comprising a casing consisting of a longitudinally extending hollow cylindrical wall, mounted in a substantially horizontal position, and end. members closing the opposite ends thereof, a shaft extending longitudinally of said cylindrical wall and rotatablymounted in said end members in spaced relation tov the cylindrical wall, a linty' cottonseed teed inlet at one, end of said casing, anoutlet for delinted cottonseeds leading from saidcasing at the other end thereof, delinti'ng brushes fixed upon said shaft between saidinlet and-said: outlet, said cylindrical wall having an elongated opening intermediate said" inlet and outlet, parallel,, longitudlnally spaced, circumferentialiydirected fingers fixed to. the cylindrical--wall at their leading ends only and extending substantially across said opening to provide aseries of lint discharge slits; said slits being narrower than a: cottonseed, anda plurality ofresilie'nt" lim'ng strips upon the interior surface of thecylindrical wallqextending along said cylindrical-wall the-length ofsaid delinting brushes. 19. The machineot' claim" 2, wherein the lining is rubber. A; PAZANDAK. References Cited-in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number. Name; Date 499,873 Cross= June 2.0;.1893. 1,131,545: Pasley Mar. 9; 1915 1,457,329 Voorhies. June 5,1923 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 6,154 GreatBritaine fl of 1890 10,014 Great Britain of- 1895 12,177 GreatBritain of 1890

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Patent Citations (4)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
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Cited By (6)

    Publication numberPublication dateAssigneeTitle
    DE-2337227-A1February 06, 1975Anderson Clayton & CoLinter-egreniermaschine
    US-2724148-ANovember 22, 1955Buckeye Cotton Oil CompanySeed delinter
    US-3805332-AApril 23, 1974Anderson Clayton & CoSeed delinter
    US-4520529-AJune 04, 1985Davis Boyce WSeed delinter
    US-4905351-AMarch 06, 1990Quisenberry Robert LAirline cleaner for seed cotton
    US-5249335-AOctober 05, 1993Delta And Pine Land CompanyMethod of delinting cotton seed